Dan Briggs

Dan Briggs is a first baseman who played 7 seasons for the California Angels, Cleveland Indians, San Diego Padres, Montreal Expos, and Chicago Cubs of Major League Baseball. He also played one season and part of another in Japan with the Yakult Swallows. He is the current owner of Big League Baseball in Worthington, Ohio.

Leonel Fernandez

Leonel Fernandez was a Professional Jockey from 1977-1995. Leonel rode for icons such as Betty Davis, the Sinatra Family, Mrs. Dupont, and Firestone. Leonel was a multiple stake winning rider, winning races of half a million and million dollar purses. Leonel retired due to injuries with over 2800 career wins. Lionel has been a long-time supporter of Ohio Crime Victim Justice Center and is a favorite with both our golfers and his fellow celebrities.

Mark Isbister

Mark Isbister was seven time state champion in three different weight divisions seven years straight, and Grand Champion numerous times on the open circuit. He is a former national team competitor and a Gold Medalist in the 1987 Goodwill Tae Kwon Do Games. He defeated the Korean National Champion for the Gold, and is a member of the Tae Kwon Do Hall of Fame. Isbister also served as the 1998 World Championship Mexico City head arbitrator for the games. His golf handicap is 13.

Pete Johnson

Pete Johnson played fullback for Ohio State from 1973 through 1976. Johnson's best season was in 1975, Johnson rushed for 1,059 yards and set single OSU single season records for rushing touchdowns (25) and scoring (156 points). In 2000, Johnson was selected for the Ohio State Football All-Century Team.

In 2007 Johnson was inducted into Ohio State's Athletics Hall of Fame. A superb rusher and blocker, Johnson excelled at running back for the Bengals. He was the team's leading rusher for all seven seasons. His best season was in 1981, when he was a Pro Bowl selection. Johnson set career highs in rushing (1,077 yards), receptions(46), receiving yards(320) and touchdowns(16), leading the team to a 12-4 record. In his eight NFL seasons, Johnson rushed for 5,626 yards, caught 175 passes for 1,334 yards, and scored 82 touchdowns (76 rushing and 6 receiving).

In his eight NFL seasons, Johnson rushed for 5,626 yards, caught 175 passes for 1,334 yards, and scored 82 touchdowns.

Advocate "Model of Justice" Award Recipient

Joanne Aubrey

Volunteer Advocate

Ohio Crime Victim Justice Center

Nominator: Cathy Harper Lee

Joanne Aubrey is a pioneer in the anti-domestic and sexual violence movements.

Joanne endured several years of abuse by her husband. On December 18, 1969, three weeks after she left him, Joanne’s husband shot her at close range with a sawed off shotgun. Joanne was 31 years old.

It was nothing short of a miracle that Joanne lived. She lost her spleen, a kidney, part of her liver, part of her pancreas, two-thirds of her stomach, and pieces of her ribs. It took 18 months, and ten major surgeries to recover.

For attempting to murder Joanne, her husband only spent 24 hours in jail and was released on a $5,000 bond. He then drained her bank accounts and fled to another country. Although Joanne discovered where he was, justice officials would not extradite him.

Joanne, determined to help domestic violence victims, decided to become a lawyer. In 1981, Joanne began her legal career as a domestic relations attorney with an emphasis on helping domestic violence victims. She also began reaching out to justice officials, and countless other groups, to provide education about domestic violence and needed improvements in the criminal systems response. She appeared on numerous radio and TV programs. Keep in mind, the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA), the first federal source dedicated directly to domestic violence shelters and programs, wasn’t yet established. Joanne has always been a pioneer.

Since May 2015, Joanne Aubrey has had the passion, energy, drive, and commitment to help protect the rights of hundreds of crime victims each year by donating her time and expertise to Ohio Crime Victim Justice Center. 

At 79 years old, Joanne is still demonstrating her compassion, commitment, and pioneer spirit of improving the lives of crime victims by currently helping draft implementation legislation for the Marsy’s Law Ohio constitutional amendment.

Special Courage "Model of Justice" Award Recipient

Officer Eric Joering

1978 – 2018

Westerville Police Department

End of Watch:

Saturday, February 10, 2018

Nominator: John Johnson

Officer Eric Joseph Joering was a 1997 graduate of Westerville South High School and attended the Columbus State College Police Program

On February 10, 2018 Officers Morelli and Joering were killed in the line of duty while responding to a 911 domestic violence call.

Domestic violence calls are often the most dangerous for responding officers. Although the 911 call came in to the Westerville Police Department as a hang up, and officers had been called to the residence numerous times before, Officers Morelli and Joering understood the cycle of violence and responded swiftly. They lost their lives protecting the lives of a mother and her child and the Westerville community.

Westerville Police Chief Joe Morbitzer said the word hero is thrown around like candy, but the title truly applied to Officers Morelli and Joering – long before Feb. 10.

Officer Morelli was a 29 year veteran of the Westerville Police Department. In 2012, Officer Morelli was elected by his peers as the Westerville Division of Police Officer of the Year for outstanding actions and conduct. Officer Morelli was also recognized for taking place in the 2015 Ohio Law Enforcement Torch Run, supporting the Special Olympics of Ohio.

Officer Joering was a 16 year veteran of the Westerville Police Department.  During his time with the Westerville Police Department Officer Joering was a patrol officer, worked in the Detective Bureau, and then became a K-9 Officer partnered with Sam. Thankfully, Sam has gone home to live with Officer Joering’s family.

Officer Joering was three times recognized with the Exceptional Duty Award. He was also recognized with a commendation in 2013 for his role in an investigation that led to the arrest of dealers with links to high-level drug traffickers in Mexico. 

More than just dedicated officers, these two men were dedicated fathers and husbands.

Officer Morelli is survived by his wife of 28 ½ years Linda, son Christopher, daughter Elizabeth,  and future son-in-law, Dan Frank.

Officer Joering is survived by his wife Jami and his young daughters, Eva, Elena, and Ella.  

Because they responded to that call, Officer Morelli will not walk his daughter Beth down the aisle at her wedding. Officer Joering will not watch as his three young daughters, Eva, Elena, and Ella graduate from high school.

Westerville police chaplain James Meacham, a friend to both Morelli and Joering, said “We are tired of all the evil and darkness. We need the light.”

The man indicted for the murders of Officers Morelli and Joering has a history of violence and is facing two charges of aggravated murder of a police officer. He faces the death penalty if convicted.

Special Courage "Model of Justice" Award Recipient

Officer Anthony Morelli

1978 – 2018

Westerville Police Department

End of Watch:

Saturday, February 10, 2018

Nominator: John Johnson

Officer Anthony Pasquale Morelli was raised in Massillon, Ohio. He was a  Kent State University and Ohio State Highway Patrol Academy graduate.

On February 10, 2018 Officers Morelli and Joering were killed in the line of duty while responding to a 911 domestic violence call.

Domestic violence calls are often the most dangerous for responding officers. Although the 911 call came in to the Westerville Police Department as a hang up, and officers had been called to the residence numerous times before, Officers Morelli and Joering understood the cycle of violence and responded swiftly. They lost their lives protecting the lives of a mother and her child and the Westerville community.

Westerville Police Chief Joe Morbitzer said the word hero is thrown around like candy, but the title truly applied to Officers Morelli and Joering – long before Feb. 10.

Officer Morelli was a 29 year veteran of the Westerville Police Department. In 2012, Officer Morelli was elected by his peers as the Westerville Division of Police Officer of the Year for outstanding actions and conduct. Officer Morelli was also recognized for taking place in the 2015 Ohio Law Enforcement Torch Run, supporting the Special Olympics of Ohio.

Officer Joering was a 16 year veteran of the Westerville Police Department.  During his time with the Westerville Police Department Officer Joering was a patrol officer, worked in the Detective Bureau, and then became a K-9 Officer partnered with Sam. Thankfully, Sam has gone home to live with Officer Joering’s family.

Officer Joering was three times recognized with the Exceptional Duty Award. He was also recognized with a commendation in 2013 for his role in an investigation that led to the arrest of dealers with links to high-level drug traffickers in Mexico. 

More than just dedicated officers, these two men were dedicated fathers and husbands.

Officer Morelli is survived by his wife of 28 ½ years Linda, son Christopher, daughter Elizabeth,  and future son-in-law, Dan Frank.

Officer Joering is survived by his wife Jami and his young daughters, Eva, Elena, and Ella.  

Because they responded to that call, Officer Morelli will not walk his daughter Beth down the aisle at her wedding. Officer Joering will not watch as his three young daughters, Eva, Elena, and Ella graduate from high school.

Westerville police chaplain James Meacham, a friend to both Morelli and Joering, said “We are tired of all the evil and darkness. We need the light.”

The man indicted for the murders of Officers Morelli and Joering has a history of violence and is facing two charges of aggravated murder of a police officer. He faces the death penalty if convicted.

Prosecutorial "Model of Justice" Award Recipient

Honorable Ron O'Brien

Franklin County Prosecutor

Nominator: Jane McKenzie

Ron O’Brien is a lifelong resident of Franklin County.  He earned his undergraduate degree in Business Administration from Ohio Dominican College and his Juris Doctorate degree from The Ohio State University, cum laude. After graduation from law school, he was appointed as Assistant Prosecuting Attorney and later, a Senior Assistant Prosecuting Attorney. In 1978, Ron O’Brien was appointed Columbus City Prosecutor. In 1985, Ron O’Brien was elected Columbus City Attorney, and was re-elected in 1989 and 1993. He was elected to his first term as Franklin County Prosecuting Attorney in 1996, and subsequently re-elected in 2000, 2004, 2008, and 2012. He is now the longest serving Prosecutor in the history of Franklin County.

Ron O’Brien served as President of the Ohio Prosecuting Attorneys Association, and the Ohio Director on the Board of Directors of the National District Attorneys Association. He served on the Governor’s Drunk Driving Task Force and was appointed by the Chief Justice to serve on the Joint Task Force to Review the Administration of Ohio’s Death Penalty. He has been recognized in the publication “Ohio’s Top Lawyers” and received numerous professional and civic awards. He was recently nominated by his peers throughout the state of Ohio and named Ohio’s Prosecutor of the Year for 2015.

Prosecutor O’Brien support the protection and enforcement of crime victims’ rights.  In 2017, although the Ohio Prosecuting Attorneys Association voted to not support Marsy’s Law, Prosecutor O’Brien spoke out in favor, and spoke out strong, in support of Marsy’s Law.

“After long days in court filled with hearings that are designed to protect the rights of defendants, I often wonder why Ohio’s judicial system cannot be more balanced if you are a crime victim.”

“It’s time for equal enforceable rights for crime victims. With more than two decades of experience as Franklin County’s prosecuting attorney, I have seen firsthand the suffering that crime victims and their families endure.”

Attorney Advocate "Model of Justice" Award Recipient

Lorie McCaughan

Clinical Professor

Attorney at Law

Capital University Law School

Nominator: Kendra Carpenter

Lorie McCaughan has practiced family law her entire legal career and has fought for hundreds of domestic violence victims on a pro bono basis, both through Capital University Law School and in private practice.  She has instructed hundreds of law students about domestic violence.  Lorie has a phenomenal record of public service including: LSS-CHOICES Board of Directors (2012 – through merge with Lutheran Social Services 11/2013);  Interfaith Legal Services Steering Committee Member; Ohio Crime Victim Justice Center Member Advisory Board;  Franklin County Specialized Docket Advisory Committee, Member (since 2015) and has advocated for a domestic violence only docket to faster process CPO actions; CBA Homeless Shelter Project, Pro Bono Attorney (since 2000); The Center for Family Safety and Healing,  Family Violence Research Collaborative; and Victim Services Centralized Intake Center, Member Work Group initiated by Ron O’Brien.

Lorie has served as the General Litigation Clinic Supervising Attorney and Senior Supervising Attorney of the Family Advocacy Clinic, Civil Protection Unit and was instrumental in the development and oversight of a Family Advocacy Clinic that has provided services to victims of domestic violence for almost 20 years. Lorie has served as a volunteer and pro bono lawyer to assist those without the means to hire counsel.  Lorie assists domestic violence victims who find themselves homeless or “working on the street.”  She is a champion of the under-served population who do not have any resources to remove themselves from abusive environments, children who seemed destined to repeat the violence they witness, and those who get lost in the justice system.

Lorie has selflessly committed to helping countless domestic violence victims and children who are caught up in the cycle.  For over 20 years, she has served as a mentor to law students and practitioners, and is a well-known “go to” resource for many courts and organizations in family/domestic violence areas.

Judicial "Model of Justice" Award Recipient

Honorable Michael Murry

Xenia Municipal Court

Nominator: Wendy Ricks Hoff

The Honorable Michael K. Murry, who took the bench of the Xenia Municipal Court on January 2, 2008, has been a model of justice for all. Judge Murry had one mission when he was elected, to run an exemplary court and treat any person before the court with dignity and respect. This was not just a promise reserved for persons charged with an offense, but for anyone, including crime victims.

The Victim Assistance Program through the Xenia City Law Department has been a daily presence in the courtroom because of the efforts of Judge Murry in ensuring all victims of crime have a voice and have access to their rights.  Judge Murry ensures that an advocate is present at every arraignment, every in-chambers conference, trial, disposition and sentencing, and provides advocates with notice of probation terminations so that we may keep victims of crime informed about all stages of the process. Judge Murry may see a case in which an advocate is generally not involved, and is known to call the Victim Assistance Program from the bench to find out if there is victim input before proceeding. Judge Murry believes that crime victims’ input is vitally important and that crime victims’ rights are an integral part of the process.  Judge Murry is careful to ensure that both defendants and victims of crime are treated with dignity and respect, and views this position as imperative in maintaining fairness and protection of the rights of all.

Crime victims in the Xenia Municipal Court are heard and validated. Judge Murry goes the extra mile to try to understand the experiences of crime victims, and the traumatic effects that can result from those experiences. Judge Murry truly cares about making ethical, compassionate and legally sound decisions, and in his ability to affect change. It is a pleasure to advocate for victims of crime before a Judge that 100% believes that crime victims’ rights are important and meaningful.

Advocate "Model of Justice" Award Recipient

Mark Beckwith

Advocate

Summit County Prosecutor’s Office

Deliquency Division

Nominator: Devorah Pasternak

Mark Beckwith is an Advocate in the Summit County Prosecutor’s Office Delinquency Division. Mark holds a Master of Arts in Criminal Justice and is a Licensed Social Worker, Licensed Independent Chemical Dependency Counselor, and Clinical Supervisor. He went through training to become a CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) and is a Registered Advocate with Senior Standing. Mark has 17 years of experience working as a Victim Advocate but also worked for several years as a Juvenile Probation Officer. This experience not only provided Mark with a distinctive skillset, but also a unique perspective of the system that many victims will navigate.

Mark’s years of experience and sincere care for victims’ experience in court and beyond is what truly sets him apart. Mark acts as that solid source of support and information that helps ground victims and makes what can be a tumultuous process less unpredictable and traumatic. Whether by one’s side in the courtroom, sharing conversation in a conference room while waiting for a hearing, or updating a victim by phone, Mark’s attention to detail makes sure that every victim receives appropriate attention and care, information about their rights, and that their voice is heard by the Court.  He will sit with victims for hours during stressful court hearings, provide support by making referrals for services, and uses creative thinking to help victims when they have nowhere else to turn.

A victim wrote of him, “My Victim Advocate, Mark Beckwith, I can’t thank him enough. He was the most helpful. I have high anxiety issues in general, and more now since the incident, but Mark made me feel comfortable and at ease. Always kept in contact with me, always showed concern, and always with the best communication. I think he is a great asset to the Summit County and hope that he will continue to provide continued services to future victims of crimes committed. Thank you.”

Advocate Leadership "Model of Justice" Award Recipient

Terri Heckman

CEO

Battered Women’s Shelter and Rape Crisis Center of Summit and Medina Counties

Nominator: Melissa Hamlin

Terri Heckman is the CEO of the Battered Women’s Shelter and Rape Crisis Center of Summit and Medina Counties. Throughout her 35 year career in victim services, Terri has added additional rights for domestic violence and sexual assault victims in the counties in which she works. She has spoken in front of hundreds of community groups and trained many generations of victim advocates with her special message about victim rights.

When Terri came to work for the Battered Women’s Shelter she excelled in her vision and development of programs that address the basic needs of crime victims by advocating for more funding and better facilities. Fast forward to present day, where she is now leading the way to the opening of a new state-of-the-art, one of a kind shelter for domestic violence and sexual assault victims.

Terri has changed the name to Center for HOPE AND HEALING and is helping thousands find their way back to a full, happy and healthy life.  The Center for HOPE AND HEALING is a model project that can be duplicated throughout the state and country.  Terri has been leading the way by encouraging other shelter directors to not settle for the old shelters that our society once thought were “good enough” for victims of violence.  Terri believes that people deserve more, deserve better, and she proved that victims will feel better about themselves when they are in an environment where they can flourish and become positive and excited about life again. 

Terri’s dream will help thousands of victims for many, many years to come.  At one of her many speaking engagements, Terri said: “Every victim deserves the right to sleep peacefully and safely in one’s own bed and home.  The right to eat a meal at a table where family and friends share stories of their day.  The right to sit on a couch and watch children playing with smiles on their faces and not a care in the world.  The right to love and to be loved.”

Law Enforcement "Model of Justice" Award Recipient

Detective Mathew Austin

Ohio University Police Department

Nominator: Kimberly Castor

Detective Austin is a six year veteran of the Ohio University Police Department. Throughout his career he has been recognized numerous times for his dedication to going above and beyond to better serve his community.  Detective Austin gives each investigation 110% and throughout the process remains survivor centric, trauma informed, and does anything he can to help the survivor regain control.    

Throughout his sexual assualt investigations, Detective Austin remains personable, approachable, survivor centric, trauma informed, and professional. He helps survivors regain control over their lives in any way he can. He is transparent and respectful to all involved. His approach to investigations and working with survivors of sexual assault is what all survivors deserve.

Brie Sivy is a sexual assault survivor and sophomore in college who has turned her experience into a message of courage and hope for other survivors. She has since changed her major to Social Work and is an aspiring Victim Advocate. Brie has been actively involved in work on Ohio University’s campus to improve the responses people get when they disclose an assault.

She also led organizing efforts for a Start by Believing event which drew over 200+ attendees.  Speaking publicly about her assault for the first time, she discussed her case with Detective Austin, who was the lead detective and the first person to interview her about the assault.

Together, they demonstrated what they believe other survivors should know and their goal that all survivors should receive positive responses when they disclose, just as she did from Detective Austin.  Brie’s assailant has since been convicted and was sentenced to a prison term.

Brie has taken a truly awful experience that happened to her and is using it to help others. I cannot wait to see what her future holds because, as a sophomore in college, she is already changing lives.a

Special Courage "Model of Justice" Award Recipient

Brie Sivy

Survivor

Nominator: Kimberly Castor

Detective Austin is a six year veteran of the Ohio University Police Department. Throughout his career he has been recognized numerous times for his dedication to going above and beyond to better serve his community.  Detective Austin gives each investigation 110% and throughout the process remains survivor centric, trauma informed, and does anything he can to help the survivor regain control.    

Throughout his sexual assualt investigations, Detective Austin remains personable, approachable, survivor centric, trauma informed, and professional. He helps survivors regain control over their lives in any way he can. He is transparent and respectful to all involved. His approach to investigations and working with survivors of sexual assault is what all survivors deserve.

Brie Sivy is a sexual assault survivor and sophomore in college who has turned her experience into a message of courage and hope for other survivors. She has since changed her major to Social Work and is an aspiring Victim Advocate. Brie has been actively involved in work on Ohio University’s campus to improve the responses people get when they disclose an assault.

She also led organizing efforts for a Start by Believing event which drew over 200+ attendees.  Speaking publicly about her assault for the first time, she discussed her case with Detective Austin, who was the lead detective and the first person to interview her about the assault.

Together, they demonstrated what they believe other survivors should know and their goal that all survivors should receive positive responses when they disclose, just as she did from Detective Austin.  Brie’s assailant has since been convicted and was sentenced to a prison term.

Brie has taken a truly awful experience that happened to her and is using it to help others. I cannot wait to see what her future holds because, as a sophomore in college, she is already changing lives.

Leadership to Inspire "Model of Justice" Award Recipient

Marsy's Law for Ohio Team

On November 7, 2017, an overwhelming majority of Ohio voters passed Marsy’s Law with a record breaking 83% show of support.

Marsy’s Law provides Ohio’s crime victims the right to safety and protection, privacy, notification of proceedings, to be present at proceedings, to provide impact statements at proceedings, and the right to restitution. Rights that will now be enforced as vigorously as the rights of the accused. Marsy’s Law clarifies that crime victims can protect and enforce their rights via motions and appellate review.

Marsy’s Law was named after Dr. Nicholas’ sister, Marsalee (Marsy) Nicholas, a University of California Santa Barbara student, who was stalked and killed by her ex-boyfriend in 1983. A week after Marsy was murdered, Dr. Nicholas and Marsy’s mother walked into a grocery store after visiting Marsy’s grave and were confronted by the accused murderer. They were not told he had been released on bail.

They were not informed Marsy’s murderer had been released because the courts and law enforcement, though well-meaning, had no obligation to keep them informed. While criminals have more than 20 individual rights spelled out in the U.S. Constitution, crime victims have none.

The passage of Marsy’s Law has changed that in California, Illinois, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Ohio. Crime victims have rights and legal standing to enforce their rights.

Efforts to pass Marsy’s Law are currently underway in Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Kentucky, Maine, Nevada, North Carolina, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.

We are grateful to Dr. Nicholas for dedicating his time and resources to ensure that all crime victims in the United States have equal access to justice and the ability to enforce their rights.


Marsy's Law for Ohio Team

Dr. Henry Nicholas, Jon Fleischman, Jeff Kaye, Scott Scheid

Ohio Survivors – Joanne Aubrey, Ronda Blankenship, Maria Bonvechio-Mineral City Warrior, Danielle Brewer, Anna Herb, Danielle Morlan, LaTresse Miller, Stacey Stevens

Attorney General Mike DeWine, Prosecutor Sherri Bevan Walsh, Prosecutor Ron O’Brien

Strategic Public Partners – Darrin Klinger, Kevin Schmidt, Christopher Albanese, Joey Boggs, Corey Edwards, Emily Hunter, Carlo LaParo, Brandon Lynaugh, Aaron Marshall, Lanny Spaulding, Trevor Vessels

New Visions Group - Derrick Clay

MADD Ohio – Andrea Rehkamp

Crime Victim Services – David Voth

Ohio Crime Victim Justice Center – Chelsea Balhaj, Andrew Franks, Cathy Harper Lee, Tanice Prince,  Elizabeth Well, Christopher Woeste, Bobbie Yeager, Lia Williams

Louis Breeden

Before his NFL career, Louis Breeden played for North Carolina Central University. After graduating college, he was selected by the Bengals in the seventh round of the 1977 NFL draft.[2] In 1978, he became a starter and immediately made a big impact for Cincinnati, intercepting 3 passes and recovering 2 fumbles. Breeden once again had injury problems during the 1979 season, playing just 10 games and recording no interceptions, but he came back full-time in 1980, and ended up leading the Bengals with a career-high 7 picks.

Michael Wiley

Michael Wiley is a former professional American football running back in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys.

Michael Wiley was a running back for The Ohio State University 1996 – 1999.  He scored touchdowns  the first three times he touched the ball as a collegian, while playing against Rice University in 1996 (a 49-yard reverse run and receptions of 51 and 60 yards)

Wiley finished a distinguished playing career after recording 2,951 rushing yards (509 attempts), 3,176 total offense yards, 4,194 all-purpose yards, ten 100-yard games, 56 receptions and 35 touchdowns. Wiley also completed 10-of-11 career passing attempts for 225 yards and 2 touchdowns.  Wiley now works in Nonprofit Organization Management.

Maria Durant

Maria Durant is a four time Emmy Award Winning Reporter for ABC 6 and FOX 28 News. Maria has received numerous Associated Press Awards and has been honored with several awards from the Society of Professional Journalists.

A graduate of The Ohio State University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism and Political Science, little did Maria know she would someday become a news story herself.In October of 2006 Maria was diagnosed with Breast Cancer. But instead of hiding her diagnosis, Maria decided to share her story in hopes of helping others.Maria is involved with several cancer organizations ... and as a Filipino she especially wants young Asian American Women to know that it can happen to them. But that early detection is the key.

Robert Jackson

Robert Jackson is a former American football safety in the National Football League.  Jackson played safety for the Cincinnati Bengals from 1982 through 1989 and was one of the All Time Top Five Safety. Jackson played college football at Central Michigan.

Mickey Jackson

Mickey Jackson serves on the Marshall University Board of Directors , Marshall University Foundation. Mickey was Offensive Backfield Coach at Ohio State University from 1974-1979 and Offensive Receivers Backfield Coach at Marshall University from 1970-1973.

A 1968 graduate of Marshall University, Mickey won three letters each in football and in track. He played tailback in football and finished fourth nationally in scoring in 1965.

Cleo Miller

Cleo Miller is a President-General of the Universal Negro Improvement Association and a former professional American football running back who played nine seasons for the Kansas City Chiefs and Cleveland Browns. He is the uncle of NFL defensive lineman Frank Okam of the Houston Texans. 

In 1977, Miller had the best season of his career. He rushed for 756 yards on 163 carries, career-highs in both categories, and scored four touchdowns. He also set a career-high with 41 receptions. The Browns were 8th in the league in rushing yards and had the 3rd best yards per carry.

Gregory Donald "Greg" Pruitt

Pruitt is a former American football running back in the NFL from 1973 through 1984.  He was selected to five Pro Bowls, four as a member of the Cleveland Browns  and one as a member of the Los Angeles Raiders, the last one as a kick returner. Pruitt was also part of the Raiders' Super Bowl XVIII winning team, beating the Washington Redskins. 

In 1979, Pruitt won ABC's Superstars,  an all-around sports competition that pits elite athletes from different sports against one another in a series of athletic events resembling a decathlon. 

Greg Frey

Greg Frey, a three-year starting quarterback for the Ohio State Buckeyes, led the team to t  wo notable come-from-behind wins. On September 24, 1988, he rallied Ohio State from a 20-33 deficit in the final four minutes to a 36-33 victory over the ninth-ranked LSU Tigers. On October 28, 1989, the Buckeyes were losing 0-31 to the Minnesota Golden Gophers. Frey brought the team back for a 41-37 win, throwing a total of 362 yards. Frey currently offers private coaching services for high school quarterbacks and calls high school football games on the SportsTime Ohio television network.

Dee Miller

A highly-touted recruit, considered "the next Cris Carter," Dee Miller's time at Ohio State was unfortunately hampered by a knee injury.  For two years though, he was able to generate enough production to clinch him multiple top-ten places in OSU's all-time receiving stats lists.  

Scouting concerns about his knee saw him slip to the 6th round in the NFL draft. He played for a few teams in the league before shifting his focus to the next phase of his life.  He established a successful insurance practice in Hilliard, Ohio, as well as a career as a radio broadcaster on 97.1 The Fan.

Dave Fulcher

Dave Fulcher played safety for the Cincinnati Bengals and the Los Angeles Raiders in the NFL.

His nickname, "Fo-Rock" was bestowed when an opponent, after being stopped by Fulcher, exclaimed "Man, I felt like I just ran into a rock!"  Combine "Rock" with the "Fo" of his last name, and "Fo-Rock" was born.

For his performance, Fulcher was a three-time Pro-Bowler, a First-Team All Pro in 1989, and a Second-Team All Pro in 1990.

His 31 interceptions at the Bengals are third all-time behind Ken Riley, and 2018 Rock and Jock Celebrity Golfer Louis Breedon.

In 2017, he was named 6th on the list of "All-Time Cincinnati Bengals."