Disability Rights Ohio Logo

Guest Writer: Disability Rights Ohio

Crime victims who are deaf or hard of hearing encounter many specific barriers not typically encountered by the hearing when attempting to report crimes, receive victim services, or seek justice in the criminal justice system. 

Crime victims who are deaf or hard of hearing may not report crimes for a variety of reasons, including that the process of reporting crimes is not accessible to them, that they fear they will not be believed, or that they believe nothing will happen after they report the crime. 

JoAnne Aubrey with OCVJC sign

Volunteer Spotlight: JoAnne Aubrey

JoAnne Aubrey has spent many years working to help victims of domestic violence. Her own experience with domestic violence has caused her to speak out for victims and give back to her community. As a former domestic relations attorney, JoAnne comes to Ohio Crime Victim Justice Center with a special set of skills that have been invaluable in assisting the organization.

Deafness and hard of hearing symbol

Right Focus: Right to an Interpreter

Persons who are deaf or hard of hearing have numerous special rights during the criminal justice process. These rights are designed to ensure that persons who are deaf or hard of hearing have access to the criminal justice process and system. Some of those rights are laid out in the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) and others come from state law.

OCVJC in ASL

Deaf Awareness Month

The purpose of Deaf Awareness Month is to increase awareness of the individuals, culture, and concerns in the deaf community. Due to the communication barrier between hearing individuals and deaf individuals, the deaf community is often isolated from the hearing community. This isolation has led to a different culture that may not be known or understood by many in the hearing community. Increased awareness is the first step in bridging the gap between the hearing and deaf communities.

Artina Logo

Donor Spotlight: Artina Promotional Products

is a local promotional product company located in Powell, Ohio. Artina has supported Ohio Crime Victim Justice Center for over a decade. The business was started by Chris Bouzounis in 1967 and is named after his son and daughter, Art and Matina, who serve as the president and vice president of marketing. What started out as a small business with one printing press in the basement has grown to serve over 2,500 clients.

Pamela A. Kaylor Headshot

Guest Writer: Pamela A. Kaylor, Ph.D.

My journey in life began in a house where physical abuse was prevalent and scary. My father beat my mother on a pretty regular basis. I left home when I turned eighteen to escape -- and moved in with who would become my husband then my batterer. After years of abuse and much heartache and pain, I left that relationship and embarked on the long road from victim to survivor. With the help of others, I eventually broke that cycle of violence. Today, I have a wonderful relationship, a loving home for my children, and a life filled with gratitude and joy.

Rights Focus: Law Enforcement Notifications

Victims’ rights in Ohio are basically comprised of rights to be notified, present, and heard. The right to be notified is perhaps the most crucial because, without it, the rights to be present and heard cannot be exercised. Ohio legislators acknowledged the importance of notice to victims when they enacted Ohio Revised Code sections and .

Danielle Morlan

After a long delay, Morrow County Victim finally sees justice served

It was a long journey, but justice has finally been served. After over three years of delay and injustice, Danielle Morlan saw her offender convicted on multiple felonies. Danielle’s ordeal first began in 2012 when she bravely reported terrifying threats, harassment, and stalking by her soon-to-be ex-husband. Unfortunately, the court failed Danielle. The criminal court charged her offender with misdemeanor crimes, then put her case on hold because the divorce case was ongoing.

Larry Queen

Sponsor Spotlight: Queen Financial

On April 11, 2016, over a hundred of OCVJC’s supporters joined us in honoring survivors, advocates, law enforcement, prosecutors, legislators, and community leaders who have made significant contributions in protecting, enforcing, and advancing the rights of crime victims. These individuals possess the courage to fight, strength to heal, power to survive, and leadership to inspire. They are truly “Models of Justice.” 

Pages